Ascorbic Acid Not for IVs
"The problem here is that everyone keeps talking about ascorbic acid intravenously when they really should be using sodium ascorbate or at least highly buffered ascorbic acid." - Robert Cathcart, MD

Ascorbic Acid Orally - Not for IV

Dear Vitamin C Foundation

I have found that vitamin C in the ascorbic acid form is the best form to take orally. I have been able to achieve what I call the ascorbate effect with only ascorbic acid by mouth. Mineral ascorbates by mouth, while being a fine source of vitamin C, do not seem to carry the same punch, probably more electrons.

However, Klenner and I have used sodium ascorbate intravenously and when used rarely intramuscularly. This is confused by the fact that even Klenner referred to the intravenous solutions as ascorbic acid. However, I had talked with him before his death and also talked with his wife and nurse, Annie Klenner, and they said it was the sodium ascorbate powder that he simply mixed in water that he used. See http://www.orthomed.com/civprep.htm

All this is further confused by the fact that the commonly available form used by many orthomolecular physicians is from Merit Pharmaceuticals and it is labeled ascorbic acid. It is, however, made as prescribed in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia made from ascorbic acid and then buffered to a pH of 5 or 6 (I have to check for that exact pH specified) with sodium hydroxide or sodium bicarbonate. This, in effect, is actually mainly sodium ascorbate. It cannot be pure ascorbic acid because that would be a pH of 3.5 and that would be far too acid. The problem here is that everyone keeps talking about ascorbic acid intravenously when they really should be using sodium ascorbate or at least highly buffered ascorbic acid.

All this is bound to be causing mistakes. Last week I was consulting with three doctors at the Mayo Clinic that are allowing an old patient of mine I had seen years ago, die of pneumonia rather than give her sodium ascorbate. She was in the habit of taking 30 grams of ascorbic acid by mouth per day. I had cured her of transverse myelitis years ago to the astonishment of the transverse myelitis experts and the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco with several weeks of sodium ascorbate intravenously. They, of course, did nothing to follow up on this cure with further investigations. Anyway, the Mayo Clinic doctors were giving the usual nonsense arguments about not using C like that it would cause metabolic acidosis. I pointed out how ridiculous this was to worry about metabolic acidosis when you were giving an alkali solution. But they kept talking about ascorbic acid.

There is in the literature a story about a black man who was given intravenous ascorbic acid for a small burn who died of subsequent kidney failure. Here again we have the ascorbic acid story. In some foreign countries, they are beginning to pick up on this intravenous vitamin C for cancer. I want to make sure they use either sodium ascorbate or highly buffered ascorbic acid. There are bound to be mistakes if we keep talking about ascorbic acid intravenously without qualification.

So please modify all the references to ascorbic acid intravenously to preferably sodium ascorbate or at least highly buffered ascorbic acid. Also it is important that it not have preservatives.

Thanks.

Dr. Robert Cathcart, III, MD

www.orthomed.com