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 Nanobacteria 
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Post Nanobacteria
Dear Dr. Fonorow, Lately i have been reading a lot about calcium deposits in the arteries and I came across this word nanobacteria as the cause of high calcium score in a cat scan. My husband has been on high vitamin supplementation for almost two years now and when he had his latest scan his calcium score was way high up. I was reading this book (The calcuim Bomb), that says nanobacteria is one of the major cause of calcification's all over our body not just in the arteries. In my husband's case it's concentrated in the arteries where you don't want them to be. Have you heard about this?? Thank You Very much..


Sun Apr 26, 2009 1:34 pm
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Ascorbate Wizard
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Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 3:16 pm
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Location: Lisle, IL
Post Re: Nanobacteria
I have heard about this, I am not expert, but I am suspicious of anything as to be so small as to be almost undetectable by ordinary microscopes. It is true that in my experience, the Pauling therapy seems to have little effect on calcium scores. There is evidence of increased blood flow and evidence that blockages within the arteries recede. My theory is that calcium deposits in the interior and on the outside of the arterial wall. We know several drugs routinely given to heart patients (e.g. blood thinners) promote these deposits, while a hormonal-like role of vitamin K is to regulate calcium from soft tissue into bones. I would add vitamin K - a good vitamin K2 (micrograms) or K1 (up to 40 mgs) daily. Let us know if this, over time, lowers his calcium score.

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Mon Apr 27, 2009 4:44 am
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Post Re: Nanobacteria
Dear Doctor Fonorow, You have mentioned that Vitamin K2 can take out calcium from soft arteries and brings it back to the bones where it belongs.. However, if you check all bottles of Vitamin K, it says take one capsule a day only... You recommended that 40mg should be taken if someone has a high calcium score.. In my husbands case, his calcium score was more than 1,000.. How much Vitamin K would you recommend?? He's now taking Vitamin K-7 (as menaquinone-7 from soy)or K2 150 mcg.. Will appreciate your reply.. Thank So Much


Thu May 28, 2009 6:05 am
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Ascorbate Wizard
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Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2005 3:52 pm
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Post Re: Nanobacteria
Nanobacteria or anything that contributes to inflammation could promote calcification.
I think that with the discovery of MK-7 effectiveness in reducing calcification that supplementation with high doses of K1 are unwarranted since they may reduce glutathione levels.
An effective range of MK-7 is 45-150 micrograms.

It is also a good idea to supplement with D3 in sufficient quantity to achieve 25(OH)D levels between 50-80 ng/dl.
See vitamindcouncil.org, where you can order a test kit and vitamin D3 from links on the page.
For people living north of Atlanta or those who don't get much sun, it may require up to 5,000 iu daily.

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"Unless we put medical freedom into the constitution...medicine will organize into an undercover dictatorship..force people who wish doctors and treatment of their own choice to submit to only what..dictating outfit offers." Dr. Benjamin Rush


Thu May 28, 2009 8:10 am
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Post Re: Nanobacteria
Quote:
I think that with the discovery of MK-7 effectiveness in reducing calcification that supplementation with high doses of K1 are unwarranted since they may reduce glutathione levels.
An effective range of MK-7 is 45-150 micrograms.


I did not know that K1 can reduce glutathione levels. Wouldn't glutathione be effective in destroying the nano bacteria? Just wondering since Dr. Levy says that it is the "master anti-oxidant". Also, has anyone tried the lyposheric form of Glutathione by Liveon Labs yet to see how effective it is?


Thu May 28, 2009 8:28 pm
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Post Re: Nanobacteria
J.Lilinoe wrote:
Quote:
I think that with the discovery of MK-7 effectiveness in reducing calcification that supplementation with high doses of K1 are unwarranted since they may reduce glutathione levels.
An effective range of MK-7 is 45-150 micrograms.


I did not know that K1 can reduce glutathione levels. Wouldn't glutathione be effective in destroying the nano bacteria? Just wondering since Dr. Levy says that it is the "master anti-oxidant". Also, has anyone tried the lyposheric form of Glutathione by Liveon Labs yet to see how effective it is?

I have been taking the LivOn Labs lypospheric glutathione. I'm not sure how one would determine whether it is "effective." However, there was a noticable improvement in my alertness and sense of physical well-being. This despite the fact that I already take a boatload of other supplements (including plenty of Vitamin C of course).

I now start the day with one packet of lypo glutathione and also one of lypo-C, on an empty stomach. Despite my favorable impression of the glutathione, taking it on a daily basis was not an easy decision. As the LivOn Labs advertising notes, glutathione is a sulfur based compound, so they caution that it has a strong odor and taste. Boy they are not kidding! The odor is so awful I practically have to hold the packet at arms length when I tear it open. I mix it with a little OJ and try to toss it down my throat without even swallowing, then follow with some water. It's still a horrible experience. Also, did I mention that it's very expensive? Yet, I'm going to stick with it because I really can really feel the difference that it makes.

The only way you can know if it is right for you is to try it for yourself. If you can afford it, get one box and try a packet daily for a while.

-- Magister22


Fri May 29, 2009 1:35 pm
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Ascorbate Wizard
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Post Re: Nanobacteria
Good report. I wish there was a way to hide the taste/smell better, it is the same problem with Livon's labs competitors. Too bad they can't use capsule technology...

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Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath


Sun May 31, 2009 5:13 am
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Post Re: Nanobacteria
Quote:
Good report. I wish there was a way to hide the taste/smell better, it is the same problem with Livon's labs competitors. Too bad they can't use capsule technology...


capsule technology? I thought that the substance was already encapsulated in tiny nanospheres and that that is why it was way more absorbable? Wouldn't regular capsules cause the substance to be destroyed in the stomach? Did you have another type of capsule in mind? I also ordered me 2 boxes of glutathione from Livon Labs recently for my mother to take to boost her immune system. I mix it in some blueberry juice made from frozen unsweetened blue berries from Costco and it makes the blueberry juice a little tart but
still quite drinkable. But its true, when you open the packet, it has a strong odor to it.Whew.


Tue Jun 02, 2009 1:10 am
Ascorbate Wizard
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Post Re: Nanobacteria
Yes, apparently there are technical reasons why you cannot enclose the liposomes in capsules - to get down the throat.

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Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath


Wed Jun 03, 2009 4:34 am
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