Define Plaque as used in your postings

Answers to questions about vitamin C and its relation to all forms of cardiovascular disease

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j2iron

Define Plaque as used in your postings

Post Number:#1  Post by j2iron » Thu Mar 06, 2008 7:06 am

Hello all! I am brand new to this forum and this is my first post, I hope I am in the correct area.

In reading thru the information on this site I see references to "chronic scurvy" and "scabs' that are formed on arterial walls and also to the reference of "plaque" that forms on arterial walls. My question is: what about calcium deposits in arterial walls? Is this the same as the plaque mentioned in Dr. Paulings research? Will Dr. Paulings formula work on calcium deposits, how does one know if his or her plaque is the treatable type, and is there in fact any difference in treatable types? Thank you,

J2iron

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Re: Define Plaque as used in your postings

Post Number:#2  Post by ofonorow » Fri Mar 07, 2008 11:06 am

j2iron wrote:Hello all! I am brand new to this forum and this is my first post, I hope I am in the correct area.

In reading thru the information on this site I see references to "chronic scurvy" and "scabs' that are formed on arterial walls and also to the reference of "plaque" that forms on arterial walls. My question is: what about calcium deposits in arterial walls? Is this the same as the plaque mentioned in Dr. Paulings research? Will Dr. Paulings formula work on calcium deposits, how does one know if his or her plaque is the treatable type, and is there in fact any difference in treatable types? Thank you,

J2iron

Excellent question. You might want to obtain Dr. Levy's recent book, STOP AMERICA'S #1 KILLER, as this may help to clarify the process of chronic scurvy, er, atherosclerosis leading to arterioslcerosis. They have changed the terms and usage, hoping to confuse us no doubt, but atherosclerosis has been used for 50 years to describe a particular lesion in the walls of arteries, and I know that when scraped out of the neck (carotid) arteries, it is white. Atherosclerosis generally will not show up on a FAST CT-Scan, meaning you can have blockages without calcium (and as it turns out, you can have high calcium, without blockages.)

What I think I know from Willis, Pauling, Bush, et.al. is that Lp(a) starts the process, uses whatever material is available to start the patch via the lysine binding site on the Lp(a) molecule, and that in the beginning the arterial "plaques" are soft and white.

Over time, they tend to harden, and become what used to be called arteriosclerosis. However, if you are taking the rat poision derived blood-thinning drugs, calcium will build-up very quickly in the arteries, so it isn't always a function of time.

What we have learned from Sydney Bush's Cardioretinometry is that while the soft plaques are easily and quickly reversible with vitamin C, the hard calcified plaques take longer to reverse, but there is evidence that within 2 years on the proper nutrition, even calcified plaques can be returned to normal..

But there are other issues/complications as outlined by Dr. Levy.

Hope this helped.

What I know about this will be available in book form - soon.
Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath


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