Promising Brain (Short Term Memory/Cognition) Aid

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Promising Brain (Short Term Memory/Cognition) Aid

Post Number:#1  Post by ofonorow » Tue Jan 24, 2017 3:33 pm

This may be premature, I have been investigating brain supplements that help with short term memory problems and improve cognition. As I reported previously, Life Extension's MEMORY PROTECT, with lithium, did the opposite. It seemed to have harmed both my short-term memory and cognition. The differences were noticeable and negative, and I felt better (the short-term memory loss that started after I began the supplement stopped) after stopping this supplement.

Some other Life Extension brain supplements seemed to have no effect, one way or the other.

After seeing the "jelly fish" television commercials, for what looked to be a prescription drug, I found a dietary supplement Prevagen with the same technology (the active ingredient is Apoaequorin - a calcium binding protein found in Jelly fish.) We have only tried one bottle, but the results so far have been impressive in the relative I am concerned about.

Since the pills cost about $1/pill (although cheap next to Viagra) I have backed off, and ordered more.. Leaving the rest for my relative.. So far so good.

The literature provided showed a study that 90 days on Prevagen improved short-term memory and reduced cognitive errors. We haven't yet been on it 30 days and I have been impressed with the positive effects. (If anyone else tries Prevagen, please let us know your results.)

Sidenote. I wanted to reorder but the Naturopath who I had ordered from no longer offers the product?!? Doing a search it looks like both the FDA and FTC have gone after this product :evil: They claim it is "synthetic." So I bought about $1000 worth in case it goes off the market altogether. (Can't wait for Trump's promised 75% cut in government regulations!). By the way, almost all the vitamin C on the market is "synthetic."

We covered my disappointment with Life Extension's brain products, especially the potentially harmful MEMORY PROTECT, here
http://www.vitamincfoundation.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=12838
Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath

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Re: Promising Brain (Short Term Memory/Cognition) Aid

Post Number:#2  Post by johnyascorbate » Wed Jan 25, 2017 12:39 pm

Have you thought about giving phosphatidylserine a try? Sharp Thought by country life is a great product. I have been using it for a long time, so have friends and family. Phosphatidylserine provides a very noticeable feeling, sort of like taking a large dose of magnesium. It is one of the best things you can take for your brain and health in general.

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Re: Promising Brain (Short Term Memory/Cognition) Aid

Post Number:#3  Post by ofonorow » Thu Jan 26, 2017 12:29 pm

I'll put it on the list. (What I think I'm learning from Prevagen is that "calcium binding proteins" are required for short-term memory, and may be depleted with age.) No doubt the brain has a lot (and needs) phosphatidylserine.

From
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphatidylserine
I notice that brains have a lot of this substance, however

Health claims

A panel of the European Food Safety Authority concluded that a cause and effect relationship cannot be established between the consumption of phosphatidylserine and "memory and cognitive functioning in the elderly”, “mental health/cognitive function” and “stress reduction and enhanced memory function”.[2] The reason is that bovine brain cortex- and soy-based phosphatidylserine are different substances and might, therefore, have different biological activities. Therefore the results of studies using PS coming from different sources cannot be generalized.[2]
Cognition

In May, 2003 the Food and Drug Administration gave "qualified health claim" status to phosphatidylserine thus allowing labels to state "consumption of phosphatidylserine may reduce the risk of dementia and cognitive dysfunction in the elderly" along with the disclaimer "very limited and preliminary scientific research suggests that phosphatidylserine may reduce the risk of cognitive dysfunction in the elderly. FDA concludes that there is little scientific evidence supporting this claim."[10][11]

The FDA declared that "based on its evaluation of the totality of the publicly available scientific evidence, the agency concludes that there is not significant scientific agreement among qualified experts that a relationship exists between phosphatidylserine and reduced risk of dementia or cognitive dysfunction".[10] The FDA also noted "Of the 10 intervention studies that formed the basis of FDA's evaluation, all were seriously flawed or limited in their reliability in one or more ways", concluding that "most of the evidence does not support a relationship between phosphatidylserine and reduced risk of dementia or cognitive dysfunction, and that the evidence that does support such a relationship is very limited and preliminary".[10]

Early studies of phosphatidylserine on memory and cognition used a supplement which isolated the molecule from the bovine brain. Currently, most commercially available products are made from cabbage or soybeans because of concerns about mad cow disease in bovine brain tissue.[12] These plant-based products have a similar, but not identical chemical structure to the bovine derived supplements; for example, the FDA notes "the phosphatidylserine molecule from soy lecithin contains mainly polyunsaturated acids, while the phosphatidylserine molecule from bovine brain cortex contains mainly saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids".[10]

A preliminary study in rats in 1999 indicated that the soy derived phosphatidylserine supplement was as effective as the bovine derived supplement in one of three behavioral tests.[13][14] However, clinical trials in humans found that "a daily supplement of S-PS [soybean-derived phosphatidylserine] does not affect memory or other cognitive functions in older individuals with memory complaints."[15]
Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath

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Re: Promising Brain (Short Term Memory/Cognition) Aid

Post Number:#4  Post by ofonorow » Mon Mar 20, 2017 5:25 am

Update. I am happy and a little amazed.
Lets see, we started in early January and it is now mid-March. While unscientific, I do think that the Prevagen product has lifted the person I was concerned about out of a dementia-like fog into almost near normalcy.

The small study the Naturopath included with my first shipment demonstrated a straight line improvement (fewer cognitive errors) over the course of a 3 month study, on what looked to be one pill per day. We are taking the strongest pill, one pill per day, and I am very happy. I am not sure what to do about maintenance, however.

It would be interesting if someone with Alzheimer's were to try Prevagen.
Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath


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