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 Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders 
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Ascorbate Wizard
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Post Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
Clinical studies have shown that the antioxidant vitamins C, A, E, and recently vitamin D, are all valuable to maintaining and improving lung health.

(See the Linus Pauling memorial video (http://www.vitamincfoundation.org/videos) for a very interesting verbal report on a study that found vitamin C has a large positive effect on emphysema.)

There are numerous studies, some confusing because of low, infrequent dosages. The message from the following cross section is simple. The antioxidant vitamins are cheap, inexpensive, and nontoxic. Vitamin C may be the most important for lung health, especially if you smoke. With so little downside, why wouldn’t you want to supplement on a daily basis?


Lets begin with an overview by Dr. Joe Mercola

http://www.mercola.com/1998/archive/vitamin_c.htm
Vitamin C May Cut Lung Disease Risk

Mercola wrote:
The results from three recent Western studies also suggest that vitamin C may lower the risk of obstructive emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and other forms of chronic lung disease. COPD is a major cause of death and disability in the US and other countries.


Another summary from Ivanhoe news service

http://www.ivanhoe.com/channels/p_chann ... oryid=3529
Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders ...
Quote:
"A study has found that vitamin C may prevent symptoms associated with airway diseases such as cystic fibrosis, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The findings were published in the March 2, 2004, issue of the Proceedings of the [U.S.] National Academy of Sciences.

In the two-year study, researchers discovered that vitamin C supports the normal hydration of airway surfaces, while vitamin C deficiency may lead to dry, sticky mucus membranes lining the airway. Thus, low levels of vitamin C may play a role in the progression of common inflammatory airway diseases by making the airways susceptible to infections. "


More from Mercoloa. He describes yet another study that finds vitamin C, alone, is the factor in maintaining higher lung function.

Quote:
More and more studies are finding dietary factors play a key role in lung function. In particular, there is evidence that individuals with a high intake of vitamin C, A, and E tend to have higher levels of lung function. Other studies have also suggested an association between higher magnesium intake with higher lung function and a reduced risk of asthma.

Nine years ago researchers from the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom investigated the relationship between lung function and dietary intakes of magnesium, vitamin C and other antioxidant vitamins. Now, the researchers have repeated the study with half of the same individuals who were part of the first study. Participants answered questions about their diet, and smoking and had their breathing levels tested again.

The study finds, after adjusting for smoking, higher intakes of vitamin C and magnesium, but not vitamin A and E were associated with higher levels of lung function. Plus, the decline in lung function over the nine years was lowest among those who had the highest levels of vitamin C. The loss of function had no relationship between intake of magnesium, vitamin A or E.

Researchers conclude a high dietary intake of vitamin C or of foods rich in this vitamin may reduce the rate of loss of lung function in adults. This in turn may help to prevent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
SOURCE: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2002;165:1299-1303


The next study finds that those with low vitamin C have higher inflammation, as would be predicted by the "vitamin C is an antioxidant" theory.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_DocSum

Plasma vitamin C concentrations in patients with cystic fibrosis: evidence of associations with lung inflammation.

abstract wrote:
Vitamin C status and possible associations with the disease process in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients were investigated. Plasma vitamin C concentrations in patients from two different mid-European populations (Swiss, n = 62; Austrian, n = 60) taking no or low-dose vitamin C from multivitamin supplements did not differ from each other or from control subjects (n = 34). Vitamin C concentrations decreased with age (5.05 mumol.L-1, y-1). When followed up for 12 mo, patients had the highest plasma vitamin C concentrations in February and the lowest in May and August (P < 0.01); the decrease in vitamin C was accompanied by increases in plasma malondialdehyde (P < 0.001) and tumor necrosis factor alpha concentrations (P < 0.01). During supplementation with vitamin E for 2 mo or beta-carotene for 12 mo vitamin C concentrations did not change. They correlated inversely with white blood cell count (r = -0.36, P = 0.008), bands (r = -0.36, P = 0.02), alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (r = -0.45, P = 0.002), interleukin 6 (r = -0.46, P = 0.0006), and neutrophil elastase/alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor complexes (r = -0.34, P = 0.02). In patients with vitamin C concentrations < 40 mumol/L, all indexes of inflammation were relatively high, whereas those with concentrations > 80 mumol/L (upper quartile of control subjects) showed clearly lower values. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that by scavenging oxygen free radicals vitamin C interacts with an inflammation-amplifying cycle of activation of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, release of proinflammatory cytokines and oxygen free radicals, and inactivation of antiproteases.


If you smoke read the following. (As you know, we prefer guinea pigs studies.)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_DocSum
Vitamin C prevents cigarette smoke-induced oxidative damage in vivo.
Guinea pigs.

abstract wrote:
In this paper, we substantiate the in vitro results with in vivo observations. We demonstrate that exposure of subclinical or marginal vitamin C-deficient guinea pigs to cigarette smoke causes oxidation of plasma proteins as well as extensive oxidative degradation of the lung microsomal proteins. Cigarette smoke exposure also results in some discernible damage of the heart microsomal proteins. The oxidative damage has been manifested by SDS-PAGE, accumulation of carbonyl and bityrosine, as well as loss of tryptophan and protein thiols. Cigarette smoke exposure also induces peroxidation of microsomal lipids as evidenced by the formation of conjugated dienes, malondialdehyde, and fluorescent pigment. Cigarette smoke-induced oxidative damage of proteins and peroxidation of lipids are accompanied by marked drop in the tissue ascorbate levels. Protein damage and lipid peroxidation are also observed in cigarette smoke-exposed pair-fed guinea pigs receiving 5 mg vitamin C/animal/day. However, complete protection against protein damage and lipid peroxidation occurs when the guinea pigs are fed 15 mg vitamin C/animal/day. Also, the cigarette smoke-induced oxidative damage of proteins and lipid is reversed after discontinuation of cigarette smoke exposure accompanied by ascorbate therapy. The results, if extrapolated to humans, indicate that comparatively large doses of vitamin C may protect the smokers from cigarette smoke-induced oxidative damage and associated degenerative diseases.



The following two studies indicate the importance of pregnant women taking vitamin C, or said another way, the danger to the fetus of a mother who does not obtain enough vitamin C. One of the dangers vitamin C can overcome is lung failure in premature infants.

The first is from the U. S. National Institutes of Health. (Normally we don’t like mouse models, but this one is different since the defect prevents the utilization of vitamin C.)

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/may2002/nhgri-01.htm
Vitamin C Transporter Gene Discovery In Mice Suggests Possible Role for Ascorbic Acid in Preventing Life-threatening Complications Seen in Premature Infants

Low Vitamin C Could Be Linked to Massive Brain Bleeding and Lung Failure in Premature Newborns"

NIH wrote:
In what could provide new clues to the causes underlying the serious complications associated with premature birth, scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) have discovered a possible link between reduced vitamin C availability during pregnancy, and the devastating respiratory failure and massive cerebral bleeding that can occur immediately following premature birth.

What surprised scientists was the discovery that the vitamin C-deprived mice died within minutes after birth due to massive cerebral hemorrhage (bleeding in the brain) and complete respiratory failure when their lungs failed to expand. These severe health problems occurred whether the newborn mice were delivered normally after 21 days gestation, or delivered early at 18.5 to 19.5 days by Caesarian section to avoid birth trauma.


Monkeys are another good animal model because they don’t make their own vitamin C.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medical ... wsid=23742

Vitamin C Supplementation Limits Effect of Nicotine on Primate Fetal Lung Tissue

Quote:
Vitamin C supplementation during pregnancy in rhesus monkeys limited the deleterious effects of nicotine exposure to their offspring


Based on the above studies, every pregnant woman (and Reshus monkey) should be advised not to smoke and to supplement vitamin c.

Vitamin A


The following article is a finding that vitamin A may "cure" a lung disease.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3329103.stm

Vitamin may cure smoking disease

BBC wrote:
A form of vitamin A could one day provide the basis for a cure for the smoking disease emphysema.
British researchers have found that retinoic acid, a derivative of vitamin A, can cure the disease in mice.


Vitamin D

Researchers link vitamin D to healthier lungs

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20051212/hl_ ... s_dc;_ylt=
AiXfWqJOs520a52.a_VxGccQ.3QA;_ylu=X3oDMTBiMW04NW9mBHNlYwMlJVRPUCUl

Fair and Balanced

Finally, we’ll end on a contrary note. The following German study claims that 500 mg daily of vitamin C has no clinical benefit for chronic bronchitis. We accept this result, and we thank Drs. Hickey and Roberts for explaining why.

This study concludes that 500 mg daily will not be of much clinical benefit. We don’t know from this study, however, if much larger doses applied more frequently in line with the Dynamic Flow model would have better results, and it is improper to extrapolate the conclusion to higher dosages.

We all wish medical researchers would ignore the "upper tolerable limits" and find out.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... med_DocSum
[Antioxidant treatment with N-acetylcysteine and vitamin C in patients with chronic bronchitis]
500 mg daily - no clinical benefit

_________________
Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath


Thu Dec 22, 2005 11:59 am
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Ascorbate Wizard
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Post Dr. Hemila
Dr. Harri Hemila sent me these two links of his work:

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/ ... i_n9469932

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/a ... 1/art00026

Vitamin C Supplementation and Respiratory Infections - a Systematic Review
Quote:
Eight of these trials were double blind and placebo controlled and seven were randomized. Five small trials found a statistically significant 45 to 91% reduction in common cold incidence in the vitamin C group. These trials were short and the participants were under heavy exertion during the trial. Furthermore, three other trials found a statistically significant 80 to 100% reduction in the incidence of pneumonia in the vitamin C group.

_________________
Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath


Wed Apr 12, 2006 9:28 am
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
1. Proton pump inhibitors (i.e. Nexium® & Prilosec® ) reduce the bioavailability of dietary vitamin C...

Unnaturally low stomach acid (elevated pH) is a double whammy. Low acid leads to infection, because intestinal flora find it easier to travel up the gut to the lungs. Acid blocking drugs also block vitamin C at the same time, which hampers the immune system.



2. Positive Effect of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) on prevention of hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis in rabbits...

The notion that oxidation of lipids and propagation of free radicals may contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is supported by a large body of evidence.

Low dose of ascorbic acid (0.5 mg/100 g body weight/day) did not have any significant effect on the percent of total area covered by atherosclerotic plaque. However, ascorbic acid when fed at a higher dose (15 mg/100 g body weight/day) was highly effective in reducing the atherogenecity. With this dose the percent of total surface area covered by atherosclerotic plaque was significantly less (p < 0.001). This suggests that use of ascorbic acid may have great promise in the prevention of hypercholesterolemia induced atherosclerosis.



3.

Prolonged deterioration of endothelial dysfunction in response to postprandial lipaemia is attenuated by vitamin C in Type 2 diabetes...

4.

Ascorbic acid improves the intrahepatic endothelial dysfunction of patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension...
5.

Vitamin C Beats Bird Flu and Other Viruses, Too...
6.

Vitamin C supplements help maintain vitamin E in smokers...
7.

U. of Chicago: Vitamin C treats avian flu better that current drugs...
8. Diet Rich In Vitamin C Linked To Better Lung Function...

9. Asthma Sufferers: More Vitamin C = Less Medication...

10. Pharmacologic ascorbic acid concentrations selectively kill cancer cells: Action as a pro-drug to deliver hydrogen peroxide to tissues ...

11. Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C) Kills Cancer Cells...

12. Vitamin C Beats Bird Flu and Other Viruses, Too...

13. Better Than A Flu Shot - Vitamin C Does The Trick...

14. Colds 'may trigger child cancers' ...

15. Chances of Surviving Throat Cancer Improve on Diet Rich in Vegetables and Vitamin C...

16. Avian Bird Flu Treatment...
Dr. Cathcarts Page on the new influenza threat...

17. Management of fatty liver disease with vitamin E and C compared to ursodeoxycholic acid treatment...

CONCLUSION: [Even Low Amounts] "Vitamin E plus C combination treatment is a safe, inexpensive and effective treatment option in patients with fatty liver disease, with results comparable to those obtained with ursodeoxycholic acid. Since more effective new therapeutic options are lacking, patients with fatty liver disease should be encouraged to take vitamin E and C supplements, which are safe and affordable."


Thu May 15, 2008 3:17 am
Vitamin C Master
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
You two have spent a lot of time and effort to make these excellent posts. Thanks and keep up the good work. Everyone should take (lots of) vitmain C!


Tue Aug 17, 2010 2:41 pm
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
rasarver wrote:
Everyone should take (lots of) vitmain C!
This is quite the sweeping statement.
(It's curious how the moderator lets some go without a peep, like this one, but not others, eh?)
Let's keep in mind that lots is not for everyone, that is the few exceptions that Stephen Sheffrey so aptly describes in his book Vitamin C: How Best to Use It
http://www.amazon.com/Vitamin-How-Best-Second-Edition/dp/0962937231/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1334769195&sr=8-3

This quote is from the book's Amazon page:

Quote:
(Amazon.com) Review
"...distills the author's lengthy review of the literature on the clinical uses of vitamin C...in an easy conversational style." -- Linus Pauling Institute Newsletter

"...extremely informative and useful...logical arguments and analysis, thorough references, common-sense approach, and clear language." -- Pauling Institute Newsletter, summer, 01

About the Author
Dr. Sheffrey, a former clinical instructor at University of Michigan School of Dentistry and former dental columnist for the Detroit Free Press, began a 6,000-hour review of the literature on vitamin C in 1986. He has written and lectured on C since 1992 and has sent at no charge 228,000 pamphlets to doctors in the U.S.

Be well everyone.


Wed Apr 18, 2012 5:37 am
Vitamin C Master
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
VanCanada wrote:
Let's keep in mind that lots is not for everyone, that is the few exceptions that Stephen Sheffrey so aptly describes in his book Vitamin C: How Best to Use It

Which exceptions are you referring to? People with low G6PD or hemochromatosis? Or the "20% of those who try high doses orally" and "experience distressing side effects". When it comes to that, Sheffrey didn't cite any studies backing that 20% figure, and I'd really like to know what he's basing it on. Also, he didn't say whether that "20%" had temporary or permanent distressing side effects, nor what specific doses caused this. Anyone can get diarrhea from C, if they take a large enough dose. So I wouldn't rely on this particular claim, unless Sheffrey wants to back it with something.

As to those with low G6PD, oral doses do not typically cause trouble; it's IV dosing they have to be careful of. And for hemochromatosis, better that they restrict their iron intake than their C intake.


Wed Apr 18, 2012 10:07 am
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
I don't know, perhaps autoimmune disorders should be carefully monitored.
For instance, if we have person with some problem in controlling immune response, extra vitamin C might make collateral damage worse.

See for instance recent paper:

Lee, Chung-Wei, Xiang-Dong Wang, Kuo-Liong Chien, Zhongming Ge, Barry H Rickman, Arlin B Rogers, Andrea Varro, Mark T Whary, Timothy C Wang, and James G Fox. “Vitamin C Supplementation Does Not Protect L-gulono-gamma-lactone Oxidase-deficient Mice from Helicobacter Pylori-induced Gastritis and Gastric Premalignancy.” International Journal of Cancer. Journal International Du Cancer 122, no. 5 (March 1, 2008): 1068–1076.


Quote:
"Reduced systemic Th1 immune responses and lower levels of Th1-mediated gastric cytokines were associated with increased H. pylori colonization levels and less severe premalignant lesions. 54 These results may in part explain the ‘‘African enigma’’ where the incidence of gastric cancer is low in some African countries, where parasitic infections are common, despite a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. 55"


For G6PD oral vitamin C might even be beneficial. It doesn't seem it influences much iron disorders. Drying effect of vitamin C (as antihistaminic) might be slightly problematic for people with with dry esophagus.


Wed Apr 18, 2012 8:37 pm
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Ascorbate Wizard
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
Quote:
I don't know, perhaps autoimmune disorders should be carefully monitored.
For instance, if we have person with some problem in controlling immune response, extra vitamin C might make collateral damage worse.


Going through this myself, and now understanding what "auto immune" is, I'd say that vitamin C is beneficial in almost all respects. The body is deficient in cortisol, which is required to modulate/regulate the immune response. Without cortisol, the body will inflame all over, starting in joints, but also muscles, bones, etc. There are high concentrations of vitamin C in the adrenal cortex. They must be there for a reason, and for most people, deficient in vitamin C, it is likely that vitamin C intake will improve adrenal function, and thus ameliorate their "autoimmune disorder" caused by a hormonal (cortisol) deficiency.

Furthermore, the body without cortisol "attacks" any tissue it thinks is in need of an immune response. For example, if I put a ring on my finger, in a few days it feels very painful, like it should fall off, but the other nine finger are fine. Also the arm I sleep on is the first to inflame, etc. Vitamin C does help. Probably by removing toxins and healing various trouble spots. IV/C will make RA sufferers much more comfortable and should be standard treatment. (My mother, with RA, discovered long ago that oral vitamin C was the only supplement that gave her relief.)

So what I have learned is that so called "autoimmune" disorders are most likely the immune system on over drive. My newly acquired knowledge is that 3 to 9 mg (prednizone equivalent) of cortisol is enough to keep the immune system in check.
Vitamin C should help both with maintaining proper endogenous cortisol production and also with keeping the general tissues healthy and toxin free.

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Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath


Thu Apr 19, 2012 3:15 am
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
What if body isn't deficient in cortisol, but autoimmunity is caused by some other factor. For instance it could be proliferation of neutrophils that refuse to die for some reason. Then higher levels of C mean higher oxidative burst by neutrophils means more collateral damage.

Quote:
So what I have learned is that so called "autoimmune" disorders are most likely the immune system on over drive.

Or it could be mycobacteria or some other invisible pathogen. In that case, C would really be optimal as it brings mycobacteria to dormancy state.

Autoimmunity is multifactorial. In some circumstances there MAY BE a problem, no matter how unlikely it is.


Thu Apr 19, 2012 4:47 am
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
Jacquie wrote:
Which exceptions are you referring to? People with low G6PD or hemochromatosis?

I don't have the book in front of me but that sounds right or at least partly right. He says everyone should get, if I remember right, their iron load status tested before embarking on megadose vitamin C intake, in case they are one of the unlucky few who should not consume megadoses. And that once you embark you should be prepared to commit to regular, frequent use for the rest of your life or else risk rebound scurvy.


Thu Apr 19, 2012 9:56 am
Ascorbate Wizard
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
We've covered "rebound scurvy" a great length. It is perhaps a 48 hour process. It can be avoided by slowly decreasing high vitamin C, but who in their right mind would want to stop vitamin C after being on a high (optimal) dose?

Quote:
What if body isn't deficient in cortisol, but autoimmunity is caused by some other factor.


It is hard to prove (the very act of measuring cortisol can affect the measurement - stress) which is one reason this is not widely accepted. (The other reason is that a lot of money is being made with the new RA drugs and little money can be made with prednizone/methotrexate).

But in my case (highest RA Factor my doctors have ever seen) I get full blown Rheumatoid Arthritis without prednizone (cortisol analog) and I AM PERFECTLY FINE with 8 mg of prednizone (cortisol) daily.

There are many other similar diseases (e.g. fibromyalgia) which are painful all over, and there are several other adrenal hormones.

I assume it is possible for the adrenals to become weak and have low output causing other "auto immune" disorders. Perhaps Lupus, for example, may have other causes/treatments. (Lack of endogneous DHEA for example?) I am just saying that not only in my case, but in a 25 year practice of a world-renown rheumatologist, RA can be easily treated at very little cost.

I was struck when my alternative doctor told me that he doesn't believe there is "any such thing as an autoimmune disease", meaning a condition where the body falsely attacks self. (He did say that symptoms can occur from a "leaky gut syndrome", and I think this may be happen to low mercury excretors exposed to mercury.)

In a perfect world, a person presents "autoimmune symptoms" (joint pain), and is given cortisol. If the pain goes away - case closed. Person is on cortisol until their own glands become active again (something like taking vitamin C daily because of GULO.) Famous rheumatologist has showed that with methotextrate - most people can wean down to as low as 1 to 5 mg daily. Live normal, otherwise healthy lives.

If cortisol does not fix the problem - then yes, there is some other issue. (But if I were the doc, my next step would be to measure all adrenal hormones looking for a deficiency.

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Fri Apr 20, 2012 2:49 am
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
Quote:
and I AM PERFECTLY FINE with 8 mg of prednizone (cortisol) daily.

How do you know ? You mean, you have no sympthoms. The same would happen if you took morphine. How do we know that you are not using cortisol too much, which attenuates immunity too much so that other pathogens can enjoy. What if, as the other doctor said, autoimmunity is because of leaky gut or some other pathogen...

How do you expect adrenals to start working if you supply hormones its making ? It doesn't work that way. Use it or loose it. Adrenal atrophy is well known effect of corticosteroid therapy like prednisone.

Like you see, its too much speculation and too little evidence.


Fri Apr 20, 2012 3:20 am
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
ofonorow wrote:
We've covered "rebound scurvy" a great length. It is perhaps a 48 hour process. It can be avoided by slowly decreasing high vitamin C, but who in their right mind would want to stop vitamin C after being on a high (optimal) dose?

Medical schools cover statin drugs at great length. Big Pharma drug reps probably covered Vioxx at great length in their day. You'll have to come up with a better argument than that. More meat and less filler please.

I very much doubt you have read the Sheffrey book since you have neatly sidestepped the very real, serious issues he raises. For example, you are assuming (once again making an "ass" out of "u" and "me" {ass-u-me}) that rebound scurvy can be someone's choice in all cases at all times. Your logic, once again, doesn't compute.

How can someone in a hospital setting (particularly if they are unconscious) avoid rebound scurvy?

It's possible to do - perhaps (like the famous case of the man in New Zealand who had his family fighting the hospital big wigs on his behalf.) But not something a discussion forum trying to be serious about vitamin C should just brush aside like you just tried to do.


Fri Apr 20, 2012 8:20 am
Ascorbate Wizard
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Post Re: Lack of Vitamin C Linked to Respiratory Disorders
And you haven't read Pauling, since you are making a mountain out of a molehill.

My point was to search, rather than rehash. If you insist:

http://www.vitamincfoundation.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=619&hilit=rebound+scurvy

Quote:
Hi,
I'm wondering why Dottore can be so sure that rebound scurvy occurs 'all the time'. Since so few big studies are done with large amounts of Vitamin C what clinical proof can Dottore provide that rebound scruvy occurs all that much. Also how long does it last since bodies are homeostatic and tend to even out extremes over time? I have stopped taking 15,000 mg of C for a few days and just observed myself slowly receding to my previous chronic conditions - stuffy sinuses and joint pains.

Awaiting your response
John :D

Quote:
"The discontinuation (rebound) effect may not be very important for most people" - Linus Pauling, HOW TO LIVE LONGER AND FEEL BETTER (Page 265, Softcover, 1986)




An article regarding the dangers of Vitamin C overdose
http://www.vitamincfoundation.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7751&p=19509&hilit=rebound+scurvy#p19509

Etc. Etc. Etc.

Everyone who takes a lot of vitamin C and stops, goes through it. Without a single known death.

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Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath


Fri Apr 20, 2012 10:28 am
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