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 How much vitamins in Fruits 
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Post How much vitamins in Fruits
Does anyone know that how much % of our need of vitamins is available in fruit and other juices. Please explain so that i can maintain my food OR any such type of suggestion.


Thu Oct 12, 2006 4:35 pm
Post Re: How much vitamins in Fruits
dan adams wrote:
Does anyone know that how much % of our need of vitamins is available in fruit and other juices. Please explain so that i can maintain my food OR any such type of suggestion.

The title was about fruits, yet the text body is about juices. Are you
asking about freshly prepared juices or processed and preserved juices?

Modern fruits are selected for sweetness, so you will face two problems
with these fruits:
(1) Lower vitamin content.
(2) More sugar (processed juices have both native and added sugar).
Sugar may reduce the efficiency of ascorbate transport (search this
forum for glucose-ascorbate antagonism).

Try to consume fresh, raw fruits, as primitive as possible. This is probably
hard to find, because fruits are sold per weight, and primitive fruits are small.


Fri Oct 13, 2006 3:15 am
Post 
Dan, is that your juice store that appears in your signature in some of your posts?

You can look up food nutrition from a number of sources including the USDA Nutrient Database. There are other places that let you compile recipes and adjust serving amouts and print out food labels, etc. such as Nutrition Data, but many of these sites rely heavily on the USDA database anyway. You can also read the label on many juice and other packaged products.

As far as what the RDA/DRI is, you can stick that into a Google search and come up with the answer. However, for optimal health many people need far more than the recommendations for key vitamins like C. Anything that stresses the body -- exercise, disease, emotional stress, etc. can greatly increase the need for vitamins. What is right for you is very personal and unique and you'll need to to some investigating to find out what is appropriate for you individually.


Fri Oct 13, 2006 4:10 am
Post sugar in juices, fruits as whole foods and pasteurization
This is from research a few years ago that I can probably find again, done by people who were supporting whole organic and raw foods with a seemingly pragmatic focus on diabetes and digestive problems. Oversimplified, this is how I understand the general concept of eating whole foods:

Store-bought juice is usually pasteurized, including most organics. Even a slightly warm temperature can damage the integrity of some fruits (or vegetables) which expedites biodegradation. Some are more sensitive or tolerant.

As I recall, nature provides unprocessed raw foods with their own digestive enzymes. If part is damaged, there goes synchronicity. Eating a variety of foods may diminish that type of problem, but if all the foods eaten have damaged enzymes, it could also make a larger overall problem. Foods also come with self-preservation mechanisms, so some whole foods should definitely not be eaten in their natrual state or entirety. Cashews are an interesting example where the seed we call a nut is coated by urushiol, a poison (think poison ivy). It requires unique handling before anyone can eat them. (Though if vitamin c has sufficient neutralizing effect on urushiol, that could be an interesting challenge to prove or disprove. http://www.health911.com/remedies/rem_pois.htm I'll try most things once, but I'm in the "you first" line on that one. )

BEANO is a digestive enzyme for people who get gas or bloating after eating certain foods because they, or what they're eating, lack necessary digestive enzymes. If you ask them and they're honest, they'll tell you BEANO doesn't always work. There may be a counterpart for fruit, but we never looked for one. Because my husband was diabetic when we began making major diet changes, it was simpler to eat whole fruits to keep sugar and fiber proportionate while utilizing the enzymes they come with.


Other thoughts:

Animals that thrive on fruit may not eat the skin or seeds, but they at least consume the pulp and juice. They don't drink 20oz of refined, pasteurized orange juice in a few minutes and consider fruit needs are met for the day.

Individual factors dictate someone may be more or less affected than the next person.

We seldom find unpasteurized fruit juices, so once in awhile we'll just make our own and drink it right away. Even then I feel guilty about tossing out the pulp and fiber.

If discussion centers on "whole foods" in absolutes as in "all the time" and "no deviation", I strongly recommend questioning the source.


Wed Jan 03, 2007 2:12 am
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Post 
According to a USDA chart I recall, they said an average orange contains about 68 milligrams of vitamin C if memory serves.

I'm not sure about vit C content but I know from studies of enzymes that generally speaking organic fruit and vegetables
have much more enzymes than the commercially farmed and packaged variety.

I had a look at the info on packages of various fruit juices here and some are pasteurised twice, first
at the source and then again upon arrival to their shipped destination, so you can consider it a
tasty fruit drink but I wouldn't count on there being much of nutritional value in them.

The thing about animals that live on a mostly veggie diet, for some of them at least the secret
is that they eat a huge quantity. Gorillas for example may eat 10% of their bodyweight in vegetation
per day!


Fri Jan 26, 2007 10:03 am
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Post Yes,
There is definitely something to be said for eating raw food full of enzymes.

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Sat Jan 27, 2007 7:51 am
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Post Re: How much vitamins in Fruits
Eating foods rich in enzymes is very important, enzymes are found in every cell of our body and can produce energy and have a great effect upon the entire immune function. You are what you eat.


Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:11 pm
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Post Re: How much vitamins in Fruits
sweetjames wrote:
Eating foods rich in enzymes is very important, enzymes are found in every cell of our body and can produce energy and have a great effect upon the entire immune function. You are what you eat.


But enzymes generally do not get absorbed into your bloodstream, even if they survive the digestion process. The enzymes in your own cells are produced from scratch from building blocks like amino acids and essential minerals. Ensuring sufficient intake of these nutrients is obviously important, but they probably do not have to be consumed as whole enzymes.


Thu Jun 10, 2010 4:34 pm
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Post Re: How much vitamins in Fruits
godsilove wrote:
sweetjames wrote:
Eating foods rich in enzymes is very important, enzymes are found in every cell of our body and can produce energy and have a great effect upon the entire immune function. You are what you eat.


But enzymes generally do not get absorbed into your bloodstream, even if they survive the digestion process. The enzymes in your own cells are produced from scratch from building blocks like amino acids and essential minerals. Ensuring sufficient intake of these nutrients is obviously important, but they probably do not have to be consumed as whole enzymes.


Your comment seems to represent generally accepted conventional dogma, and may be true in general, as perhaps only small amounts are absorbed, but remember one of the primary functions of "enzymes" in the body is to aid digestion. Another point is that while enzymes are proteins, they generally not altered by the reactions they facilitate. Enzyme therapy has been documented to dissolve blood clots, fight back pain, decrease swelling, speed up healing, fight wrinkles, ease hindered breathing, stimulate the immune system and help fight cancer (THE COMPLETE BOOK OF ENZYME THERAPY, Anthony J Cichoke, 1999)
Quote:
pg14.
Previously it was thought that enzymes (whether in foods or supplement form) could not be absorbed intact and instead were completely broken down into their smaller parts (such as amino acids) before being absorbed from the small intestine into the circulatory system. Today, we know this is untrue. Growing amounts of research by a number of highly respected scientists has shown that a significant amount of enzymes are, in fact, absorbed intact. The primary method of absorption is pinocytosis, a method in which whole molecules are engulfed by cells and absorbed.

.
.

A second method of absorption is transportation to the blood stream by way of the lymphatic system.

.
.

A third method is transcellular absorption (persorption)


I would recommend both of Dr. Nicholas J. Gonzalez's new books, TROPHOBLAST and ONE MAN ALONE as excellent proof that enzymes are not only absorbed, but can have a strong anti-cancer effect. One of the points that Gonzalez makes, using plenty of citations, is that the pancreas does not produce all the enzymes we require all the time. Instead, the pancreatic enzymes are recycled, reabsorbed and reused by the body.

_________________
Owen R. Fonorow, Orthomolecular Naturopath


Fri Jun 11, 2010 3:01 am
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Post Re: How much vitamins in Fruits
ofonorow wrote:

Your comment seems to represent generally accepted conventional dogma, and may be true in general, as perhaps only small amounts are absorbed, but remember one of the primary functions of "enzymes" in the body is to aid digestion. Another point is that while enzymes are proteins, they generally not altered by the reactions they facilitate. Enzyme therapy has been documented to dissolve blood clots, fight back pain, decrease swelling, speed up healing, fight wrinkles, ease hindered breathing, stimulate the immune system and help fight cancer (THE COMPLETE BOOK OF ENZYME THERAPY, Anthony J Cichoke, 1999)
Quote:
pg14.
Previously it was thought that enzymes (whether in foods or supplement form) could not be absorbed intact and instead were completely broken down into their smaller parts (such as amino acids) before being absorbed from the small intestine into the circulatory system. Today, we know this is untrue. Growing amounts of research by a number of highly respected scientists has shown that a significant amount of enzymes are, in fact, absorbed intact. The primary method of absorption is pinocytosis, a method in which whole molecules are engulfed by cells and absorbed.

.
.

A second method of absorption is transportation to the blood stream by way of the lymphatic system.

.
.

A third method is transcellular absorption (persorption)


I would recommend both of Dr. Nicholas J. Gonzalez's new books, TROPHOBLAST and ONE MAN ALONE as excellent proof that enzymes are not only absorbed, but can have a strong anti-cancer effect. One of the points that Gonzalez makes, using plenty of citations, is that the pancreas does not produce all the enzymes we require all the time. Instead, the pancreatic enzymes are recycled, reabsorbed and reused by the body.


Digestive enzymes (e.g. lipase, trypsin) have obviously evolved to withstand the conditions of our digestive tract. On the other hand, the vast majority of enzymes probably have not.

By the way, you are probably correct that some enzymes can be absorbed in the digestive tract - it seems to be the case for certain digestive enzymes. Other enzymes like serrapeptidase also come to mind....but again, the issue is about whether (i) enzymes ubiquitously found in fruits and vegetables are able to avoid denaturation and be absorbed in sufficient quantities, and (ii) whether these enzymes have any plausible health benefit.


Mon Jun 14, 2010 1:30 pm
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Post Re: How much vitamins in Fruits
The belief that stomach pH destroys all supplemental enzymes is erroneous. Food often remains in the upper region of the stomach for as long as an hour. Much of the digestive activity of supplemental enzymes occurs during this time before food becomes mixed with the digestive secretions, while the pH of these digestive secretions is quite low (pH 1.0-1.5),- when mixed with food, the pH of the mixture can typically range from pH 2.5-5.0. In this environment, microbial enzymes are not harmed, in fact many function optimally under these conditions.


Sun Jun 20, 2010 4:45 pm
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